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Raising Teens in a Liberal Culture

Times they are a changin’. Some of these changes don’t bother you as a parent. Other changes make you uncomfortable. You wish you could raise your kids in another era. While I’m sure this is true of all generations, technology and social/moral changes are so rapid now that I hear a lot of nervousness from parents. Here is some advice on this topic:

Helping teens grow and families improve connection,
Lauren Goodman, MS, MFT

Discipline By Leading

Occasionally you need to come down hard on your child for a transgression, but if you are doing this daily then you are an ineffective disciplinarian. Sure you might be getting compliance. People will comply out of fear. Given the first opportunity though, they will be passive aggressive as a means of expressing their resentment towards your tyranny. Teens are no exception to this rule. Sometimes they even become just plain aggressive.

If you want to impact their character so that your teenager can make independently moral and upright decisions, then you must discipline by leading. Even better is when you are lead and can then in turn lead your children. When you follow the edicts of your faith (in my household this means the instructions for life given in the Bible), you have a guide that makes it easier to parent. You have something telling you in no uncertain terms what is right and what is wrong. You are told your purpose, how to love, and how to conduct edifying family life. It makes it much easier to take your teenager’s hand and lead him through ups and downs rather than constantly nagging and exasperating him. So, lead well and watch your child shine.

Helping teens grow and families improve connection,
Lauren Goodman, MS, MFT

Feeding the Teenage Mind

Adolescents spend a lot of time filling their mind with things that don't necessarily edify them as a person. Image courtesy of freedigitalphotos.net.

Adolescents spend a lot of time filling their mind with things that don’t necessarily edify them as a person.
Image courtesy of freedigitalphotos.net.

Without meaning to, we’ve let our kids fill their minds with intellectual junk food.  We are taught to be very careful about what we eat so that we can keep our physical bodies healthy.  In our culture though, we don’t pay a lot of attention to feeding our minds with things that keep the mind healthy.  Other than schoolwork, and maybe the occasional church service or bible study, our teenagers fill their minds with social media, TV and whatever they happen to search on the internet.

 

Adolescents are at a stage where they are heavily influenced by what they read, hear and see.  As parents, it’s our responsibility to strongly encourage our teens in learning things that will truly help them in life.  This ranges from what they watch on TV to what they read online.  I realize that you can’t control everything entering your teenager’s mind.  However, you can prohibit them from watching TV shows with nudity, sexual content, cursing, drugs, etc.- whatever goes against how you’d like them to act.  Because these things are so incredibly commonplace, even on “family friendly” shows, we have become numb to them.  I was watching sports last night and a Victoria’s Secret commercial came on.  At some point in our culture’s not too distant past that would have been seen as pornography (a bunch of girls in bras and panties making seductive faces and poses); it would never have been allowed during a sports game that kids are probably watching with their parents.  Now though, that’s commonplace.  You have to think really carefully about whether you’re okay with your teenage son or daughter seeing this kind of thing.

 

Okay, so the logical question that follows my soapbox rant is, ‘What should I have my teen viewing/hearing?’  The answer to that question lies within the bounds of your values.  In our house we follow the Christian faith, so our kids spend at least some of their internet time using apps that help them understand their faith better.  In my cousin’s house, music, education and culture were highly valued so my aunt had my cousin watching movies that broadened his horizons on different cultures.  These weren’t boring documentaries, just movies made in other countries that showed another view of life in the storytelling.  This was intentional on the part of my aunt, and it paid off as my cousin became an adult.

 

There also needs to be a limit to social media.  It’s up to you how you handle this.  Maybe you limit the amount of time your son or daughter spends on it.  Maybe you strongly encourage your son or daughter to follow their role models and interact with those people as often as their friends.  That is one of the great things about social media- it’s actually possible to interact with people you could never otherwise reach.

 

The last thing that’s really important is for you to assess how you spend your spare time.  Are you watching trashy TV?  Are you always posting pictures for your friends on Facebook at the expense of reading a good book?  If you look at yourself and realize you are not feeding your mind healthy intellectual food, make a few changes.  This is actually really hard at first, but the example you set pays huge dividends with your kids.

 

Helping teens grow and families improve connection,

Lauren Goodman, MS, MFT

Teen sobriety requires a change in friends

Making new, sober friends helps a teen stop using drugs.  Image courtesy of photostock at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Making new, sober friends helps a teen stop using drugs.
Image courtesy of photostock at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

While this is not California, the statistics from this article are still very interesting to think about.  http://eastwindsor.patch.com/articles/christie-courts-mandatory-treatment-for-drug-offenders-26a17aed

 

In the state of New Jersey it has been found that mandating arrested drug offenders to treatment programs instead of jail-time has greatly reduced the repeat offense rate.  When a drug-offender simply does jail time the rearrest rate is 54% with a 43% re-conviction rate.  When mandated to treatment, the rearrest rate is 16% with an 8% re-conviction rate.

 

One thing that is rumored to happen in jail or prison is that an addict learns even more about how to be an addict.  There are a lot of drug users and dealers in prison/jail, and they educate one another in further delinquent behavior.  It is also rumored that there is a pretty significant amount of illegal drugs dealt within the prison system, sometimes making an addiction worse.

 

Whether you believe our justice system should or should not offer treatment centers as an alternative to jail/prison time, this article is a good example that treatment for addiction can be very helpful.  It also demonstrates that who you spend your time around is who you become.

 

While there’s a good chance your teenager isn’t serving jail time for a drug-related arrest, this article still applies to you.  The two important things to get from this is that 1) prisoners who spend time in the main prison population often commit drug-related crimes again and 2) prisoners who spend time around recovering addicts tend to get better.

 

If your child is acting out and participating in drug use, the most important thing you can do is change their peer group.  This is extremely challenging as a parent.  How many times have you told Junior, “I don’t like you being around those kids.  What about hanging out with so and so instead?”  Then you’re rewarded with a dirty look and an accusation that you “hate all my friends.”  This is when you need to start thinking outside the box.

 

If your kid isn’t working, help them find a job.  Teens who work develop friendships with their co-workers.  A job also takes up time that could otherwise be used to smoke a joint.

 

Your child might be farther into their drug use than just getting a job to change their peer group.  In that case, you’ll have to be more forceful and drastic.  Sending your teen to a relative’s house for about 3 months can be extremely helpful.  Do you notice that while your teen talks back towards you, they don’t talk back to your sister?  They aren’t familiar enough with your sister to do that.  It might just work to have them stay with her for a little while.  This is only effective if your relative lives far enough away that your teen cannot see the same friends.

 

If the case is more severe, you’ll have to strongly consider either rehab or teen boot camp.  Both of these methods are effective and helpful.  I’ve found that teens who go to boot camp tend to come back a little bit stronger than rehab.  However, in no way am I claiming to have completed a study on the matter.  Each rehab and each boot camp are different.  What works well with one type of teen may not be the ideal fit for another type of teen.

 

The bottom line is, teenagers begin to act like the people they are around.  Getting your struggling teen around successful teens tends to improve the decisions your teenager makes.  Just like the prisoners in this article, everyone needs someone who will show them an alternative, positive way out.  For teens the most important thing is that they think it is their idea.  This is your chance to be a creative parent and covertly help your teenager come up with a good idea for how they can start making changes.

 

Helping teens grow and families improve connection,

Lauren Goodman, MS, MFT

Vacationing With Teens

Why are vacations better for connecting with family than being home together? While there are many reasons, one is that we’re often unplugged. At home we go to different corners of the house and have personal screen time. On vacation we tend not to do that, and that time is really important.

Helping teens grow and families improve connection,
Lauren Goodman, MS, MFT